Amanda Knox Redux

Deadly Game - Cara Lockwood

All things considered, not too bad. And in the end, I have a better appreciation of what low expectations can deliver. Something about how the story unfurled reminds me of that classic guilty pleasure of mine, Wild Things, in that it has all the potential to get to crazyville by way of sexy avenue (minus Kevin Bacon's "bacon" unfortunately). 

When Cal and her boyfriend woke up one morning, with no recollection of the previous night and a bleeding, dead roommate in their bedroom in Greece, they did what foreigners in their flip-flops would do post-Amanda Knox, I suppose.

Run.

Actually, the details around the dead roommate does mirror what little I know of of the Knox case. This might be a deal-breaker for some as it might be seen as a lapse in creativity but I didn't know enough about it to be bothered. Also the majority of the story was spent with two detectives from the sleepy town of Naxos investigating the case of their lifetime, ending up with pursuing the worst possible pair of fugitives in the history of ever.

 

"How did they find us? We ditched our phones and got disposable SIM cards. They can't be traced."
"Maybe they were staking out the airport."
"Maybe," Cal sounded unconvinced.


Because its UNTHINKABLE and makes ABSOLUTELY NO SENSE for the police to surveillance the airport while looking for a couple of foreigners suspected of murder.




I don't know who to feel sorry for, these two or the Naxos Police Department for failing the Greek criminal justice system through these... kids. It's like watching a worst police investigation documentary. Gone all sorts of wrong.

Was there character depth? Believable dialogue? Relatable logic?

It's 66-pages, and a few of those had to be rationed to lukewarmerotica so *whispers* that's a no. 

But there's something about the way the complex mystery of the dead girl was built that tickled my fancy. Secret acquaintances, hidden conversations, people being in places where they aren't supposed to be and covert relationships that makes me infinitely curious where this is all heading. There's a decadence in the meat of the story outside the sex that makes me wish this wasn't an e-serial.

Because I have a bit of grief to give e-serials. Honestly, I don't know anyone who would willingly subject themselves to the torture of novella after novella each ending in a cliffhanger - the device of choice to keep the reader coming back for the next after some waiting time. Waiting?!



Personally, I prefer having all of them out before actually diving in and I don't really have a good argument to give anyone to convince them otherwise. 

But looking at this as the first offering in a serial, I'd say it did a pretty okay job.

ARC provided by St. Martin's Press thru Netgalley in exchange for an unbiased review. Quotes may not appear in the final copy